Holy Week with the Medics

Charing Cross 2It has been an unusual Holy Week. The option for 4th year medical students on ‘Death, Autopsy and Law’ has given me two great days of reflection during the week Christians remember the last week of Jesus’ life.

On Monday I acted as an extra small group facilitator for a session on ‘Personhood and Suffering’ led by Prof Tom Sensky. The session invited reflection on the overlooked question of ‘what or rather who is a person?’ There were various exercises in which students considered the important people and aspects of their own lives and identity. They were then asked to choose the two most important ones. It was an experience of imagining ‘loss’. Obviously, it was hard to choose – ‘boyfriend or parents? Which parent? Which sibling? What about my love of doing…?’ This was preparation for considering the aspects of the self that are ‘lost’ during illness.

As a Christian priest it seemed a good thing that would be doctors had to imagine themselves loosing key elements of thier own identity or personhood.  They were putting themselves in the picture of loss and suffering.They did this before looking at the case studies of patients  and thier responses to serious illness.

It was also interesting to think in this way during a week when as a  Christian I am  remember ing Jesus consciously choosing to go up to Jerusalem to offer himself into the violent social mix of religion, Empire, military occupation and oppressive taxation. Jesus gives away his life (personhood) and suffers. He does this to show us the ways we human beings use violence and conflict to avoid facing our own wounds and limitations.

The next day I had arranged for the same group to visit the Victoria and Albert Museum. Our guide took us on a tour of funeral and burial objects from different times, cultures and religions. This led to more discussion in which we considered our own approach to death and funerals.

So I spent two days with people who are looking at all aspects of death, end of life care and autopsy. It vividly reminded me that in the Christian story there is new life after Jesus’ suffering and death. And yet it also made me very aware that the risen Christ still has carries the wounds of his own death. This can not be explored through thinking – it needs a physical, bodily meditation practice.

Advertisements

Atheism and Interfaith

Here is the link to an article in the Guardian Online that Rory Fenton wrote about the need to find ways to have dialogue between religious and philosophical world views.

It gives a good account of some of the initiatives that have been tried by Imperial Interfaith to include the athiest and humanist viewpoints. Rory was Imperial College Student Union’s first Interfaith Officer, a post created last year. 

In the public sphere the boundary betwee the religious and the secular points of view is not often marked by grace or hospitality on either side. This can be equally true in the Univeristy as well.It is good that students from different religions are thinking carefully about how to use the dialogue skills they practice amongst themselves to this other area of conflict bewteen religion and secularity.

Picture from the Imperial Interfaith T-Shirt.

Sound of silence

Silent MetronomesSilent RCA began back in 2009 and grew out conversations with several students from different world views about the place of silence in our lives. One of these conversations about silence was with Josphine Winther from Jewellery. 

 Together we started to meet for 15 minutes of silence each week inviting others to join us. She has recently sent me a link to her work on silence  including her piece from the RCA Show 2010.

Initially Josephine explored the idea of having a sound proof room in the show to give people a taste of silence. However, the slowed down and silent metronomes lured visitors into a deep attentive listening and a special kind of silence in noisy chaos of the Show. We found ourselves leaning in towards the metronomes listening for and waiting for the metronomes to tick. But of course they never did and we keep on listening. Silence and stillness in the midst all the noise and activity of a busy gallery.

 Here’s a video of the the Silent Metronomes on her website.