“I’m not busy”

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“You must be very busy?”

‘I am not busy’  is a website and a book by Stephen Cherry, Dean of King’s College Cambridge. He argues,

“Busyness has become a disease.

The developed world is suffering from an epidemic of major proportions, and the disease at the heart of it is busyness.

We are addicted to doing one thing after another with as little down-time as possible. This is a sickness, a spiritual sickness.”

‘I am not busy’ is his response to our hyperactive working culture. He is an academic and a priest. He runs an organisation, writes books, broadcasts, offers  pastoral  and I assume does much more besides. But he chooses to see himself as engaged rather than busy.

This thinking might be useful for those of you concerned about high levels of stress or working with student mental health.

It is a bonus for those following the Christian season of Lent (but please don’t be put off by that if that’s not your world view).

“I am not busy” offers ten tips for responding to our ‘busyness’ culture’. It’s not only applicable to the Higher Education sector of course.

The personal response is one part of the answer. It is also good to ask about the structural causes of stress as well.

If you find it useful, let me know. I would be interested to hear your reflections.

 

 

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One thought on ““I’m not busy”

  1. Geoff Boyce March 25, 2019 / 3:36 am

    Hi Andrew! So what are the ten points?
    Busyness is one of the issues behind my writing my last book on Radical Hospitality. But by reframing the issue to one of ‘space’, I hope to avoid the compendium of ‘ what to do’ lists (to get busy with!), proposing a lifestyle direction that goes beyond ‘busyness’, which I see as only a symptom of something much deeper and more challenging.

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